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Pollinators are vital to the health of natural food webs and the functioning of ecosystems as they transfer pollen from flower to flower, fertilizing plants and leading to the growth of fruit, vegetables and grains. Pollinators include vertebrates like birds, bats and mice and invertebrates including flies, ants, wasps, spiders, beetles, butterflies, moths and bees.

Many pollinators are in serious decline in the United States and worldwide. Pollinator decline is not completely understood but disease, urbanization, pesticide use and climate change all may play a role.

The Audubon Society of Rhode Island is committed to supporting the diversity and health of pollinators through environmental education, advocacy for sound policies, and conservation of pollinator habitat and species.

Why are Pollinators Important?

Approximately 75% of the world’s flowering plants require pollinators to reproduce. In the United States alone, more than 100 species of plants require pollinators. The fruits and seeds that result provide food, beverages, fibers, fuel, medicine and other goods. The value of pollinated crops in the United States was estimated at $15 billion in 2009.

Latest Pollinator News

Get the buzz on pollinator news and upcoming events.

Audubon naturalists lead teams into the field to identify and record butterfly sightings. No experience is needed. This event is part of the North American Butterfly Association's annual survey of butterflies.

Come celebrate pollinators June 19th - 25th and help spread the word about how to protect them.

There is an increasing buzz about pollinators these days. But it’s not that sound in your garden as bees go about their business. Learn about what Audubon is doing to help our blossom-loving friends, what you can do at home and in your community and all about how you can celebrate National Pollinator Week with us!