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Pollinators are vital to the health of natural food webs and the functioning of ecosystems as they transfer pollen from flower to flower, fertilizing plants and leading to the growth of fruit, vegetables and grains. Pollinators include vertebrates like birds, bats and mice and invertebrates including flies, ants, wasps, spiders, beetles, butterflies, moths and bees.

Many pollinators are in serious decline in the United States and worldwide. Pollinator decline is not completely understood but disease, urbanization, pesticide use and climate change all may play a role.

The Audubon Society of Rhode Island is committed to supporting the diversity and health of pollinators through environmental education, advocacy for sound policies, and conservation of pollinator habitat and species.

Why are Pollinators Important?

Approximately 75% of the world’s flowering plants require pollinators to reproduce. In the United States alone, more than 100 species of plants require pollinators. The fruits and seeds that result provide food, beverages, fibers, fuel, medicine and other goods. The value of pollinated crops in the United States was estimated at $15 billion in 2009.

Latest Pollinator News

Get the buzz on pollinator news and upcoming events.

Audubon Celebrates National Pollinator Week by hosting a Bee Rally in the State House and lighting up the dome in black and yellow. That big striped State House Dome will “bee” hard to miss in June!

Audubon Designs and Monitors Pollinator Habitat by Hugh Markey
From the 2018 Spring Report

The first batch of prototype 'Nature at Work’ pollinator habitat road signs have been printed! Through her seat on the Pollinator Working Group, Audubon Senior Director of Policy Meg Kerr has worked with the RI DOT to create these signs which will be displayed amongst pollinator-friendly plants along Rhode Island roads.