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Protecting Pollinators

Pollinators are vital to the health of natural food webs and the functioning of ecosystems as they transfer pollen from flower to flower, fertilizing plants and leading to the growth of fruit, vegetables and grains. Pollinators include vertebrates like birds, bats and mice and invertebrates including flies, ants, wasps, spiders, beetles, butterflies, moths and bees.

Many pollinators are in serious decline in the United States and worldwide. Pollinator decline is not completely understood but disease, habitat loss, pesticide use and climate change all may play a role.

The Audubon Society of Rhode Island is committed to supporting the diversity and health of pollinators through environmental education, advocacy for sound policies, and conservation of pollinator habitat and species.

Why are Pollinators Important?

Approximately 80% of the world’s flowering plants require pollinators to reproduce. In the United States alone, more than 100 species of plants require pollinators. The fruits and seeds that result provide food, beverages, fibers, fuel, medicine and other goods. The value of pollinated crops in the United States was estimated at $50 billion in 2020.

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Latest Pollinator News

Get the buzz on pollinator news and upcoming events.

The case against harmful neonicotinoid insecticides grows as pollinator populations decline. Environmental groups, legislators, and supporters gathered on May 11, 2022, at the Roger Williams Botanical Center in Providence for a legislative breakfast and speaking event to rally support for legislation that would restrict the use of harmful neonicotinoid insecticides (neonics) in Rhode Island.

Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, and Vermont all regulate the use of neonicotinoid pesticides. It is time to pass this legislation to protect not only our pollinators but all Rhode Islanders. We need YOUR voice to help move this important bill forward!

Pollinators play a critical role in our ecosystems and agriculture. This year, thanks to legislation reintroduced by Representative Kislak and Senator Miller, Rhode Island has the chance to protect bees, birds, and butterflies from harmful pesticides. Read our Boston Globe op-ed, written by Audubon Senior Director of Policy Priscilla De La Cruz and The Nature Conservancy in Rhode Island's Climate & Energy Program Manager Sue AnderBois.

  • May 2019 - 2020

  • May 2019 - 2020