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Renewable Energy

We believe that Rhode Island needs to promote the rational development of renewable energy to meet the State’s greenhouse gas reduction goals and mitigate climate change while also protecting habitats. Audubon opposes the destruction of Rhode Island’s forest and other habitats to meet our renewable energy goals. We believe that renewable energy projects should be sited on brownfields, landfills, gravel pits, rooftops and other developed areas. We also believe that the state needs to put policies in place to accelerate the protection of critical unprotected forest habitat areas.


Latest Audubon Advocacy News

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Restoration and community engagement are key for climate resiliency. Thanks to Restore America’s Estuaries Southern New England Program Watershed Implementation Grant, retrofits on existing green infrastructure in Roger Williams Park as well as community training sessions and other engagement opportunities are coming to the Stormwater Innovation Center in 2023.

With intentional investments and incentives to level the costs of building solar on previously disturbed land or “preferred sites”—such as gravel pits, landfills, commercially zoned properties, rooftops, and parking lots—forests can be protected and coexist with renewable energy and clean energy jobs.

Alfred Hawkes helped Audubon turn the lens from individual birds and species to the habitat they lived in and habitat protection. Today, Audubon continues With the growing climate crisis upon us, Audubon’s most critical fight to protect the environment, wildlife and people of Rhode Island, may have just begun.

Some scientists estimate that the monarch butterfly has declined by 85 to 95 percent in New England since the 1990s. In this installment of the Newport This Week Nature in the Neighborhood series, Audubon Senior Director of Education Lauren Parmelee reflects on the uniqueness of this endangered species and what you can do to help them.