Skip to main content
MENU

Advocacy at Audubon

Audubon Society of Rhode Island promotes public policies that protect birds, wildlife and natural resources. Audubon conducts grassroots and direct advocacy to ensure that state and local policies and initiatives protect habitats and natural resources. Audubon organizes people into campaigns and coalitions to build a strong and respected environmental movement in Rhode Island and to increase the environmental literacy of elected officials and policy makers.

Join Audubon’s advocacy team!
Sign up for our email updates and action alerts and download our Advocacy Toolkit.


   Learn About the Issues

Learn about Audubon's 2023 Legislative Priorities, or explore the issue by clicking below.


Learn how to track bills, contact your legislator, testify at hearings and more! Download our Advocacy Toolkit PDF (thank you for your patience as your content downloads).

•  •  •

Access previous issues of the monthly Audubon Eagle Eye Advocacy Update!


Latest Audubon Advocacy News

Check back here often for new developments! View All Stories >

Restoration and community engagement are key for climate resiliency. Thanks to Restore America’s Estuaries Southern New England Program Watershed Implementation Grant, retrofits on existing green infrastructure in Roger Williams Park as well as community training sessions and other engagement opportunities are coming to the Stormwater Innovation Center in 2023.

With intentional investments and incentives to level the costs of building solar on previously disturbed land or “preferred sites”—such as gravel pits, landfills, commercially zoned properties, rooftops, and parking lots—forests can be protected and coexist with renewable energy and clean energy jobs.

Alfred Hawkes helped Audubon turn the lens from individual birds and species to the habitat they lived in and habitat protection. Today, Audubon continues With the growing climate crisis upon us, Audubon’s most critical fight to protect the environment, wildlife and people of Rhode Island, may have just begun.

Some scientists estimate that the monarch butterfly has declined by 85 to 95 percent in New England since the 1990s. In this installment of the Newport This Week Nature in the Neighborhood series, Audubon Senior Director of Education Lauren Parmelee reflects on the uniqueness of this endangered species and what you can do to help them.