MENU


The Report is Audubon's printed quarterly publication for members. Below you'll find previous issues ready to download. Be sure to check out the Climate Change Series, featured in the 2017 Report issues.

New!

In this Issue - Spring 2019:
The Fight to Protect our Forests
Wildlife Refuge updates around the state
Who Lives in That Hole? Audubon Kids fact page.
June - August Audubon Nature Program Guide
Let's Go Birding by Audubon Naturalist Laura Carberry

& so much more!

Want access to our latest Report issue?

Click here to become a member and receive your copy!

Click to download a copy:

 

Read the stories that have helped our members create a more informed perspective on climate change and what it means for life in the ocean state. Click the photo above to access the stories and other content.



Audubon Report Stories

Here you can read our featured Report stories and editorials.

For wildlife. For pollinators. For the environment. | People are often reluctant to change manicured green spaces into wild spaces but filling the built environment with rain gardens and pollinator meadows will help us create more resilient communities and supports wildlife and pollinator.

An editorial by Meg Kerr, Senior Director of Policy | Our forests provide innumerable services to humans and wildlife. Maintaining woodlands in rural areas of the state and promoting tree planting in suburban and urban neighborhoods is part of the climate change solution.

Learning about forests is important for all ages, so the key role that forests play in a healthy environment is a frequent talking point in many of Audubon’s educational programs.

Forests protect the water quality in local aquifers and sequester carbon from the atmosphere. They provide vital habitat, cool the environment, reduce soil erosion and provide a stress-free place for rest, recreation and rejuvenation. Audubon wants see forests in the language of the law, because when natural resources are referenced in RI laws, forests are absent, as if they don’t even exist.

Let's Go Birding by Audubon Naturalist Laura Carberry | Colorful passerines are what birders crave. They are small, flit around the treetops and can be incredibly hard to find: but the chase is what keep us coming back for more. Here are some tips on where to find them this season.

Let's go birding with Laura Carberry! It’s almost time to head out and search for one of the strangest shorebirds of New England, the American Woodcock. Learn more about these unique birds and register for a Woodcock walk!

So, what's the plan? An editorial piece by Audubon Senior Director of Policy Meg Kerr.

Audubon dedicates significant financial and human resources to our programs and our animal ambassadors, but we think the investment is well worth it. The outcome we aim for is environmental literacy, where people understand and appreciate birds, wildlife and the natural world and then will provide the necessary support to help us protect it.

The newest additions to Audubon’s animal ambassadors are an Eastern Screech-Owl named Penny whose feathers are the color of her namesake coin and a young Common Raven named Lucy, who was found on the ground last summer at a major road intersection in Connecticut.

This winter, don't forget to include plants for pollinators in your spring gardening plans! | An editorial by Audubon Senior Director of Policy Meg Kerr

  • May 2019 - 2020

  • May 2019 - 2020

  • May 2019 - 2020

  • May 2019 - 2020

  • May 2019 - 2020

  • May 2019 - 2020