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Audubon Report Stories

For wildlife. For pollinators. For the environment. | People are often reluctant to change manicured green spaces into wild spaces but filling the built environment with rain gardens and pollinator meadows will help us create more resilient communities and supports wildlife and pollinator.

An editorial by Meg Kerr, Senior Director of Policy | Our forests provide innumerable services to humans and wildlife. Maintaining woodlands in rural areas of the state and promoting tree planting in suburban and urban neighborhoods is part of the climate change solution.

Learning about forests is important for all ages, so the key role that forests play in a healthy environment is a frequent talking point in many of Audubon’s educational programs.

Forests protect the water quality in local aquifers and sequester carbon from the atmosphere. They provide vital habitat, cool the environment, reduce soil erosion and provide a stress-free place for rest, recreation and rejuvenation. Audubon wants see forests in the language of the law, because when natural resources are referenced in RI laws, forests are absent, as if they don’t even exist.

Let's Go Birding by Audubon Naturalist Laura Carberry | Colorful passerines are what birders crave. They are small, flit around the treetops and can be incredibly hard to find: but the chase is what keep us coming back for more. Here are some tips on where to find them this season.

Let's go birding with Laura Carberry! It’s almost time to head out and search for one of the strangest shorebirds of New England, the American Woodcock. Learn more about these unique birds and register for a Woodcock walk!

So, what's the plan? An editorial piece by Audubon Senior Director of Policy Meg Kerr.

Audubon dedicates significant financial and human resources to our programs and our animal ambassadors, but we think the investment is well worth it. The outcome we aim for is environmental literacy, where people understand and appreciate birds, wildlife and the natural world and then will provide the necessary support to help us protect it.

The newest additions to Audubon’s animal ambassadors are an Eastern Screech-Owl named Penny whose feathers are the color of her namesake coin and a young Common Raven named Lucy, who was found on the ground last summer at a major road intersection in Connecticut.

This winter, don't forget to include plants for pollinators in your spring gardening plans! | An editorial by Audubon Senior Director of Policy Meg Kerr

Visitors who view the conservation staff as the face of Audubon should not be surprised to find them mowing grass, repairing kiosks, building boardwalks or doing innumerable other tasks that some may not consider conservation work. But while they are happy to answer questions, identify plants and do whatever else may be necessary to help visitors enjoy their experience on the property, there is always more to do.

Five years ago, Audubon set a goal to attain accreditation with the national Land Trust Alliance (LTA) to prove to ourselves, and our supporters, that we are indeed (and not just in theory) careful and proper stewards of the land. This accreditation is the national gold standard for non-governmental organizations that conserve land.

An editorial by Audubon Senior Director of Policy Meg Kerr, on the diversity in background, skills and talents amongst people who care deeply about the environment. We can all appreciate the natural world and commit to its protection - even if we do not know all the names.

Each fall thousands of raptors fly south through New England on their way to wintering grounds. The peak time to observe the hawks is typically mid-September through mid-October. Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Connecticut all have great places to watch this wonderful migration.

The Rhode Island Birding Atlas is a five-year effort which will help to answer some big questions upon its completion: How have bird species and distribution changed since the previous study was completed over 30 years ago? How have bird habitats been altered?

Come immerse yourself in the tropics and experience the amazing diversity of bird life in Panama. Upcoming trips are December 6 – 11, 2018 or February 7 – 12, 2019 and are led by Professional Ornithologist and Audubon Board Member, Charles Clarkson, PhD. Informational sessions are available!

LET’S GO BIRDING By Laura Carberry
Often when we think of pollinators, we conjure images of bees and butterflies. But there is another, often over-looked pollinator darting around Rhode Island...

Audubon’s policy department collaborates with many partners across the state to track environmental issues and develop successful advocacy strategies. Rhode Island’s environmental community works exceptionally well together, recognizing the power of many voices working together as one. An Editorial from the Spring 2018 Report by Meg Kerr, Audubon Senior Director of Policy

Audubon Designs and Monitors Pollinator Habitat by Hugh Markey
From the 2018 Spring Report

Audubon Advocacy Gives a Voice to Pollinators in Crisis by Todd McLeish
From the 2018 Spring Report

There is no easier way to connect kids with nature than birding. Pull out some binoculars and get the whole family interested in the world outside your window. Birds can be found year round, in any habitat, and the learning possibilities are virtually endless. All you need are a few simple tools.

The 2018 legislature session is back in session. It is easy to think that advocacy ends when a good bill passes. But many times, passage of bills means that our work is just beginning. Editorial by Meg Kerr, Senior Director of Policy

Through Environmental Education, Audubon builds the next generation of conservationists. An article from the 2018 Winter Report Issue by Todd McLeish.

An editorial by Meg Kerr, Senior Director of Policy. Audubon’s 2017 legislative year was very successful, setting the stage for important work
this fall and winter.

An Audubon Report story by Todd McLeish from the 2017 Fall Report, supporting the Audubon 2017 series on climate change.

Part Four of the Audubon 2017 Report Series on Climate Change by Todd McLeish.

More Than Meets the Eye… Audubon Refuges are Nature’s Defense Against Climate Change. An Audubon Report story by Todd McLeish from the 2017 Summer Report, supporting the Audubon 2017 series on climate change.

Part Three of the Audubon Report 2017 Series on Climate Change by Todd McLeish

An editorial by Audubon Senior Director of Policy Meg Kerr on greening your personal lifestyle. Taken from the Audubon Summer 2017 Report Issue.

Audubon has long supported green, nature-based solutions to reduce stormwater runoff. Learn about Rhode Island's past, present and future efforts to improve water quality in the State.

Walter J. Berry of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reports on the status of the Seaside Sparrow. Like the Saltmarsh Sparrow, Seaside Sparrows are threatened by a loss of habitat due to climate change. An article from Audubon's Spring 2017 Report, supporting the Audubon 2017 Report series on climate change.

Part Two of the 2017 Audubon Report Series on Climate Change By Todd McLeish.

Download, view and share our infographic on climate change. What causes climate change? What are the results? What can you do?

Audubon’s Kingston Wildlife Research Station Records Bird Population and Migration Data. An article By Hugh Markey from Audubon's Winter 2017 Report, supporting the Audubon 2017 Report series on climate change.

Part One of the Audubon 2017 Report Series on Climate Change by Todd McLeish.

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