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The Report is Audubon's printed quarterly publication for members. Below you'll find previous issues ready to download. Be sure to check out the Climate Change Series, featured in the 2017 Report issues.

New!

In this Issue - Winter 2019:
Audubon's Ambassadors (Plus a welcome to two new birds!)
2018 Donors and Supporters
Squirrels! Audubon Kids fact page.
March - May Audubon Nature Program Guide
Let's Go Birding by Audubon Naturalist Laura Carberry

& so much more!

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Read the stories that have helped our members create a more informed perspective on climate change and what it means for life in the ocean state. Click the photo above to access the stories and other content.



Audubon Report Stories

Here you can read our featured Report stories and editorials.

Let's go birding with Laura Carberry! It’s almost time to head out and search for one of the strangest shorebirds of New England, the American Woodcock. Learn more about these unique birds and register for a Woodcock walk!

So, what's the plan? An editorial piece by Audubon Senior Director of Policy Meg Kerr.

Audubon dedicates significant financial and human resources to our programs and our animal ambassadors, but we think the investment is well worth it. The outcome we aim for is environmental literacy, where people understand and appreciate birds, wildlife and the natural world and then will provide the necessary support to help us protect it.

The newest additions to Audubon’s animal ambassadors are an Eastern Screech-Owl named Penny whose feathers are the color of her namesake coin and a young Common Raven named Lucy, who was found on the ground last summer at a major road intersection in Connecticut.

This winter, don't forget to include plants for pollinators in your spring gardening plans! | An editorial by Audubon Senior Director of Policy Meg Kerr

Visitors who view the conservation staff as the face of Audubon should not be surprised to find them mowing grass, repairing kiosks, building boardwalks or doing innumerable other tasks that some may not consider conservation work. But while they are happy to answer questions, identify plants and do whatever else may be necessary to help visitors enjoy their experience on the property, there is always more to do.

Five years ago, Audubon set a goal to attain accreditation with the national Land Trust Alliance (LTA) to prove to ourselves, and our supporters, that we are indeed (and not just in theory) careful and proper stewards of the land. This accreditation is the national gold standard for non-governmental organizations that conserve land.

An editorial by Audubon Senior Director of Policy Meg Kerr, on the diversity in background, skills and talents amongst people who care deeply about the environment. We can all appreciate the natural world and commit to its protection - even if we do not know all the names.

Each fall thousands of raptors fly south through New England on their way to wintering grounds. The peak time to observe the hawks is typically mid-September through mid-October. Rhode Island, Massachusetts and Connecticut all have great places to watch this wonderful migration.

The Rhode Island Birding Atlas is a five-year effort which will help to answer some big questions upon its completion: How have bird species and distribution changed since the previous study was completed over 30 years ago? How have bird habitats been altered?