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The Report is Audubon's printed quarterly publication for members. Below you'll find previous issues ready to download. Be sure to check out the Climate Change Series, featured in the 2017 Report issues.

Click the issues below to access links to individual online articles and full-issue PDF copies.

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Read the stories that have helped our members create a more informed perspective on climate change and what it means for life in the ocean state. Click the photo above to access the stories and other content.



Audubon Report Stories

Here you can read our featured Report stories and editorials.

Since 1982, Audubon has offered popular summer nature camps for children at the Caratunk Wildlife Refuge in Seekonk, MA.

This is a good time to look at the websites and postings of our elected officials. Let those leaders that focus on environmental issues know you appreciate it. Let our leaders know that the environment is a priority, and tell them that you want to see more positive outcomes in the 2020 session.

Audubon educators suggest ways to keep your kids engaged with easy and fun outdoor explorations!

Seven environmentally minded young women from Rhode Island high schools have formed the 2019 Youth Conservation League. They teamed this summer to gain valuable experience while helping numerous conservation groups with their service.

Renovation and restoration at Audubon Society of Rhode Island's Seekonk, MA Caratunk Wildlife Refuge brings renewal to this hiking hotspot.

LET'S GO BIRDING | By Audubon Naturalist Laura Carberry
Saltmarsh sparrows, Oystercatchers and a recovering marsh habitat in Quonochontaug Salt Marsh in Charlestown, RI!

For wildlife. For pollinators. For the environment. | People are often reluctant to change manicured green spaces into wild spaces but filling the built environment with rain gardens and pollinator meadows will help us create more resilient communities and supports wildlife and pollinator.

An editorial by Meg Kerr, Senior Director of Policy | Our forests provide innumerable services to humans and wildlife. Maintaining woodlands in rural areas of the state and promoting tree planting in suburban and urban neighborhoods is part of the climate change solution.

Learning about forests is important for all ages, so the key role that forests play in a healthy environment is a frequent talking point in many of Audubon’s educational programs.

Forests protect the water quality in local aquifers and sequester carbon from the atmosphere. They provide vital habitat, cool the environment, reduce soil erosion and provide a stress-free place for rest, recreation and rejuvenation. Audubon wants see forests in the language of the law, because when natural resources are referenced in RI laws, forests are absent, as if they don’t even exist.

  • May 2019 - 2020

  • May 2019 - 2020

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  • May 2019 - 2020

  • May 2019 - 2020